Blog Archives

Mike’s Tech Shop E-Waste Recycling Event

This Saturday, September 23rd, 10am-4pm

We’re once again teaming up with the Lower East Side Ecology Center to host an e-waste recycling event this Saturday 10am-4pm. Bring your old Macs, iPads, iPhones, anything Apple: computers phones, or tablets and we will make sure it gets recycled responsibly.

Posted in Uncategorized

MTS Best Practices: Backing up your Watch

James Sorrenti

We love Apple devices because they “just work,” but for the times they don’t, having a dependable backup is important; Apple Watch is no different.

When to Backup

Preparing for a backup before you hope you had one.

The most common situations one should force a backup of their Apple Watch is when doing a software update, getting a new Apple Watch or new iPhone, or sending in your Apple Watch or iPhone for service.

How to Back Up

If you regularly backup your iPhone, you are also regularly backing up your Apple Watch. There are two ways to backup your iPhone: iCloud or to iTunes on your computer.

 

iCloud is a wonderful way to backup your iPhone wherever you may be, as long as your account is in good standing, and you have more than enough required storage. You can find out when the most recent iCloud backup was performed from your iPhone:

  1. Tap “Settings” on your iPhone.
  2. Tap your iCloud name at the top.
  3. Tap “iCloud”.
  4. Tap “iCloud Backup”. (Your backup should say “On”.)
  5. On the bottom of this screen, you will see “Last Backup:” and a date and time.

 

If this date and time is not very recent, you can force a backup:

  1. Connect your iPhone to its charger and connect to a Wi-Fi network.
  2. Tap “Backup Now”.
  3. When the backup is complete, the “Last Backup:” should have today’s date and the time the backup completed.

 

You can backup your iPhone and Apple Watch onto iTunes on your computer, but to get the full benefit (and all your activity data) you must tell iTunes to encrypt your iPhone Backups:

  1. Connect your iPhone to your computer via your Lightning cable.
  2. In iTunes, select your iPhone from the upper-left corner of the window.
  3. On the left, under Settings, select “Summary”.
  4. Select “Encrypt [device] backup” in Backups.
  5. Create (and do not forget) a password when asked.
  6. It will start backing up. Future backups will be encrypted as well.

 

If you will be parting with your Apple Watch (getting a new Apple Watch or sending yours away to service) you will want to force a backup and remove your personal data from the watch. Conveniently, these both happen when unpairing your Apple Watch.

  1. Open the Apple Watch app on your iPhone.
  2. Select your Watch from the main screen.
  3. Tap the “i” next to your Watch.
  4. Tap “Unpair Apple Watch”.
  5. Follow onscreen instructions, may include authenticating with your Apple ID password.

 

What Remains

So you’ve backed up your Watch, and now after some event, you need to restore your Watch. That part is simple and built into the same pairing process you did when it was first set up. There are a few things that do not come along with the backup that you will have to set up again:

  1. Device Passcode
  2. Paired Bluetooth devices (e.g., headphones)
  3. Your debit/credit card used with Apple Pay

These things are left out for your security and because some are tied to the hardware of the device, not the software.

 

That’s it! You planned ahead and had your Apple Watch and iPhone backed up in an encrypted format that saved most of your data, and you were able to confidently use that backup to restore to your Apple Watch. Enjoy your watch with your data!

More info:

Apple’s support article on backing up Apple Watch:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204518

Encrypted iTunes backups:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT205220

Differentiating iTunes and iCloud backups:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204518

Unpairing Apple Watch:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204568

Setting up Apple Watch:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204505

Posted in MTS Best Practices

Products We Love: Moshi Gigabit Ethernet Adapter


It’s the little things in life. The new Moshi USB-C to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter is one of those little things we love. It’s compact and does the job you’d expect, adding an ethernet port to your new USB-C MacBook Pro or other USB-C computer. But it also does something you might not expect, add a USB-A (good old USB) port as well. Every other USB-C Ethernet adapter with USB-A ports that we’ve seen are all much wider and bulkier. In it’s nice little slim package, the Moshi USB-C Gigabit Ethernet Adapter is one neat little piece of engineering.

Posted in Homepage, Products We Love

Products We Love: Glyph Atom



We got a hold of one of the first Glyph Atom SSD drives when it came out. The first thing I noticed was that all my techs loved it. Drives are one of their tools so techs are very particular. If they liked the drive, I knew our customers would. The Atom is a single solid-state drive (SSD) with very fast throughput. It does 420 MB/s writing and 270 MB/s reading, making it one of the fastest single drives available. It is housed in a handsome metal case with a rubber bumper for extra protection. CNET drop tested it at 6 feet and it still worked fine. The best part: the price. At $159 for 275GB, it has the best price for any SSD we’d seen. We use them, we love them; we think you will too.

Posted in Products We Love

Hard Drives in Distress

I had a customer come in recently with a hard drive that was not working. It had all of his wedding videos on it. Before he came to us, he went to the IT guy in his office and the IT guy had tried to fix the drive. When that failed, he came to us. My heart sank. I knew that although his IT guy was trying to help, he may have permanently destroyed the irreplaceable wedding videos.

The most important thing to know about hard drives in distress is: Do not leave them running, do not try to run software to repair them. Hard drives that are experiencing problems will often make themselves worse and even destroy themselves if left running; about 15% of the time you will permanently destroy the drive so that even labs like DriveSavers cannot recover the data.


Here’s why. Spinning hard disk drives perform a variety of routine maintenance functions whenever they have time. They re-write bad sectors to new good sectors, they write logs, they scan themselves for problems. These are all good things when a drive is functioning normally. These are all dangerous things when a drive is in distress. When a drive begins to fail it can start to lose track of where things are on itself. It can begin to make mistakes. When a drive is in distress and it goes to perform its routine maintenance, it can cause even more damage. It may re-write bad sectors onto good sectors thereby destroying the data that was there and possibly breaking links to other data. The logs can be mistakenly written over good data thereby destroying it.

When you run software tools like DiskWarrior, you can cause the same problems. First of all the drive is running and can do the damage outlined above. Beyond that, when you go to fix the drive, if it is badly damaged enough it might write the fix, like a new directory on top of good data, thereby destroying it.

As it turned out, we were able to save the wedding videos. The drive had not been permanently bricked when the IT guy tried to help. This customer was lucky.

When your data is vital the only safe thing to do is to take your drive to a recovery specialist who will disable the drive’s automatic functions, make an exact bit-by-bit replica of every recoverable sector and then repair and extract the data.

Posted in Data Recovery

Gifts for Dads and Grads

Open Box Specials

Great gift ideas for Dad, 10% off.

  • iPad mini 4 Wi-Fi 16GB Space Gray – Originally $399 Now $199
  • iPad Mini 4 Wi-Fi 32GB Gold – Originally $399 Now $229
  • iPad Air 2 Wi-Fi 32GB Space Gray – Originally $499, Now $279
  • iPad Pro 9.7-inch 32GB Space Gray – Originally $599 Now $539
  • Apple Watch S1 38mm Rose Gold Alum. Sports Band – Originally $269 Now $242
  • iPod Touch 64GB Blue – Originally $299 Now $269

Quantities limited to items on hand. No substitutions or rain checks. (Sorry.)

Posted in Uncategorized

Store Associate

Position Summary

At Mike’s Tech Shop our associates are the face of our store. They provide most of the interaction with customers. This is, in some ways the most important job at Mike’s Tech Shop. We are looking for candidates with the following:

  • Sales experience at an Apple Store or Apple Service Provider
  • Great attention to detail
  • Outstanding customer service skills

In your role as Store Associate your daily responsibilities will include :

  • Sales of Apple computers, accessories and Apple related 3rd-Party product.
  • Answering customers’ questions and concerns
  • Triage and check in of Apple devices and hard drives brought in for service

This job will provide you with extensive training and tremendous career growth opportunities.

Our entire business is built on providing the best Apple retail sales and service experience in New York and we are looking for a person who is willing to go above and beyond.

Send resume and optional cover letter

Medical and 401K

Posted in Careers

Foursquare users rate Mike’s Tech Shop the Best Electronics Store in New York City!

We’re all really honored to make this list much less be rated #1. Thanks to all our customers for the great feedback. We’ll redouble our efforts to serve the Mac community better than ever. 

Foursquare – The 15 Best Electronic Stores in New York CityFour Square pic

Posted in Homepage

Jessica

Jessica

Data Recovery Specialist

Jessica started as a technician for AT&T and learned how to root phones and “Hackintosh” during free time. When she bought her college MacBook at an Apple Store, a lead Genius saw her Hackintosh and offered her a job. After working at Apple, she became an Apple Certified Macintosh Technician. She fell in love with the Internet in 1996 and is still trying to find a way to marry it.

Posted in Bio - Service

iMac In Stock

Screen Shot 2013-10-22 at 12.59.33 PM

A big, bold display. Fourth-generation Intel quad-core processors and the latest NVIDIA graphics.  An advanced Fusion Drive option.  No desktop has ever brought so much to the table.  Starting at $1299  

Posted in Uncategorized